5 Lawyer In The Making YouTube Videos To Check Out | 3 April 2018

Today I thought I would share 5 of my Lawyer In The Making YouTube videos with you that you might want to check out.  There will be another series of videos coming soon, I am just waiting for time to edit them and upload.

As always, I have a large list of videos I want to film but do send me an email/tweet or message on social media with your requests.

So here they are, 5 videos to check out today!

Lawyer In The Making Q&A

I guess I can’t really share a list of my own videos and not mention this one.  This was the first video I filmed professionally and had the best time doing it, and the nerves settled very quickly.  In this video I talk about my career, what Lawyer In The Making is all about, and also why I blog.  Watch it here Lawyer In The Making Q&A Video

Get In The Lawyer Mindset | Attend Legal Events

I am a massive advocate of law students ‘getting into the lawyer mindset’ and a great way of doing that is by attending legal events.  Now I know that sometimes these events are costly or at obscure times, or just not practical to attend.  However, you can always follow events online, using the event hashtag or ask for a copy of the notes.  Alternatively, ask if they offer a student discount on event tickets, or some people will purchase a spare to gift to someone.   Whether it is a seminar on a legal topic of interest, a public lecture, an online webinar, a conference – it is really important you try as law students to attend some.  Watch more on this here.

Law Students | How to use Twitter like a pro

Twitter is my go to platform for all things law.  It is the one I recommend most for law students and lawyers use, whether for research, news, networking or engagement.  I decided to pull together some of my top tips for law students, on how you, as law students, can use twitter like a pro – check it out here.  There are plenty more tips I could share, but the video would be stupidly long!

Law Students Stressing About Advocacy?

Advocacy doesn’t always come easy, and speaking in public is a crucial skill but one that many struggle with.  No matter how confident you are, everyone can get nervous and for some people/law students, nerves are there all the time.  Even when you think you know your material inside out, you can still get nervous.  I decided to share a few basic tips to help you here.

Are you having problems at University?

I get so many emails from law students sharing concerns they have, whether it be subject specific or problems with their law school, study methods etc.  I know that studying law can be challenging at times and you really shouldn’t have to suffer alone.  Equally if you are having problems at university or at home and these things are impacting on your studies then you do need to speak to someone.  Your personal law tutor, dean of school, or even a tutor you get on particularly well with should be your first port of call.  Speaking to someone at your university can help get the problem resolved a lot quicker, even if it is just some additional support, a deadline extension or an acknowledgement that the fact the heating is never on will be looked into! However, I am still more than happy to receive your emails and messages and try and help you where I can. Watch this video here.

Don’t forget to hit the thumbs up button on the videos, and the subscribe button!

Rebecca x

Nominated | Rising Star Awards 2018 | Law

So today I received an email and things like this always make my day, I have been nominated again for a Rising Star Award in Law for 2018.  I have just filled in the “Additional Information” that they require.

I never set up my blog to be nominated for awards or win them, but it does mean the world that people put me forward for them.  I never expected anyone to read my blog, let alone nominate me for awards such as this.  It is nice to know that the content I put out and share helps/supports/or is just of interest to my readers.

You will remember that last year I was nominated for a Rising Star Award and then made it into the Top 10 Shortlist for Rising Legal Stars 2018 which was just amazing – and I was so proud to get that far.  You can read more about that here.

I am not sure whether I will get shortlisted again, but if not, thank you all, for your ongoing support and encouragement for my blog.

By way of an update and when I will find out if I have been shortlisted, this is the time frame for the Rising Star Awards 2018:

Key dates for the awards

  • Nominations open: 01 February 2018
  • Nominations close: 25 March 2018
  • Additional Information deadline: 29 March 2018
  • Shortlist judging period: 09 – 27 April 2018
  • Shortlist announced and public vote*: 14 May 2018
  • Finalist judging period: 14 May – 10 June 2018
  • Shortlist celebration event: 06 June 2018
  • Public voting closes: 10 June 2018
  • Winners announced: 18 June 2018
  • Winners event: w/c 16 July 2018

If you know anyone in the legal profession that you think deserves to be nominated for a Rising Star Award then please do nominate them here.

I can’t wait to check out the other nominees and also see who gets shortlisted.  It is always great to celebrate the achievements of others and see what wonderful things they are doing in the legal profession.

Rebecca x

 

 

Crime Writers | Rod Reynolds

Having met Rod Reynolds at Monday Night Crime I knew I wanted to feature him on my Crime Writers Series.  He was a brilliant panelist but also everyone spoke very highly of him in terms of personality but also his writing ability.

So a few tweets and an email later, here is my interview with Rod Reynolds.  As always, links to books are at the bottom (just click on the book title)!

Crime Writers | Rod Reynolds

Crime Writers | Rod Reynolds

Who are you and what have you written? 

My name is Rod Reynolds and I am the author of the Charlie Yates series, published by Faber. My debut novel, The Dark Inside, came out in 2015 and is loosely based on a set of real life killings known as The Texarkana Moonlight Murders, which took place on the Texas/Arkansas border in 1946. The sequel, Black Night Falling, came out in 2016 and is set in the nearby town of Hot Springs, Arkansas, a hotspot for the Mob in the 40s, and the town that served as the inspiration for their plans for Las Vegas. My third novel, Cold Desert Sky, is published in July and is set in Hollywood and Vegas, just as the first casinos were opening.

Why do you write crime fiction? 

It’s what I’ve always been most interested in as a reader. Although I never really looked at labels or genres, just picking up books that interested me, I always seemed to gravitate towards crime. And one of the things I’ve learned as a writer is that you have to write what you enjoy, otherwise 100k words becomes a real slog.

Have you always wanted to be a writer? 

No, I only started writing in my 30s. I’d always been a big reader, but never dreamed of being a writer because, growing up on a council estate in north London, I didn’t know anyone who did anything like that. Even when I left university, I ended up working in advertising for almost a decade. It was only when I turned thirty and started trying to figure out what I wanted to do with the rest of my life that I decided to give writing a try. And I loved it so much, I knew I’d found my passion.

How did you become a writer? 

I took a year out of my previous career to try writing a novel. I didn’t know anything about it so I signed up for a distance learning course to get a grip of the basics. I wrote every day, working longer hours than when I was in a job – because I just loved it. I finished my first (unpublished) novel in three months and although it was rejected everywhere (I sent it to about 40 agents), I had some very positive feedback that encouraged me to try again. Then just as I was about to go back to work, I stumbled across the true life story of the Texarkana Moonlight Murders and started researching the book that would eventually become, four years later, The Dark Inside.

You undertook the City University’s Crime Writing Masters course? How did you find this? Do you recommend courses like this for aspiring crime writers? 

I really enjoyed the course and found it helped me a lot in a number of ways. And the City course was the first to offer a qualification specifically in Crime Writing. But I’m very clear whenever I answer this question that doing a Masters is not a prerequisite for becoming a published author; I’m fortunate enough to have met a lot of authors at this point, and probably the minority took an MA. I think what counts is understanding that writing is a skill and it requires practice, hard work and dedication. For me, the route to that was signing up for a masters degree, but that was a personal choice; I didn’t sign up for the degree expecting to get a publishing deal out of it – I did it because I loved writing and wanted to get better at it.

What influences the content that you write? News? Books? Personal experiences? Previous jobs? 

All of those things. I think most writers allow themselves to be influenced by all sorts of things – it’s part of the skill. My books are specifically influenced by real life places and crimes, but beyond that, all sorts of elements go into them. I’m always looking out for character traits in people I know to help bring my characters to life, for example.

Do you have to do lots of research when you are writing? 

I’ve done a fair amount, because I wanted to nail the real life elements of my novels and make sure I knew the historical facts before I started writing. I studied history, so I enjoy that part of it, to be honest. I also had to research the places my books were set, as they were all parts of the US that I wasn’t that familiar with (apart from Las Vegas). But the key is to make sure you then draw on that research sparingly. Research should give the reader the confidence that the author knows their subject – it shouldn’t take up page after page. A little goes a long way.

Do you have a writing routine? 

Not really. I have two young kids so I’m also a stay-at-home dad, so my day is structured around school and nursery runs. I do get a couple of hours each morning when my youngest is at nursery, and then it’s naptimes, evenings, whenever I can find the time. I tend to work to a target word count each day and each week, depending on what time I expect to have.

Do you ever suffer from writer’s block? If so, how do you overcome this?

I’ve never had the kind of block you read about, where I literally can’t get anything out, but I’ve spent my share of time just staring at a blinking cursor. I’m not sure there’s any way around it other than to just write; it’s hard if you feel like whatever you get down is wasted because you think you’ll just end up deleting it, but honestly, if you can force yourself to get to that computer and start tapping away, eventually it will come. I find I have to reassure myself that nothing is ever really wasted – even if I delete it the next day (and I’ve done that plenty) it’s just part of the process.

Which authors and books do you like reading? 

I love reading so there are way too many to mention. American authors have always been my biggest influence – James Ellroy, James Lee Burke, Raymond Chandler, Don Winslow and many more – but I also love reading what current writers are producing, and there’s a huge amount of talent out there right now. To pick just a few – Mick Herron, David Young, Steph Broadribb, Caz Frear, Susi Holliday, Tim Baker, Mark Hill…I could literally go on for hours, but those are some of the most recent ones I’ve read so they’re fresh in my mind.

Your first two books are part of a series, was this the intention from the outset?  Would you ever consider writing a standalone book? 

Originally I planned my second book to be set in the same universe but with a different set of characters – but when I got my deal with Faber, they liked Charlie Yates so much that they wanted to bring him back. Hence a series was born! So, in truth, The Dark Inside was written as a sort of standalone – and I’d have no qualms about writing another (although there are challenges to either approach).

What are your future writing plans? Can we expect another book in 2018? 

Yes, Cold Desert Sky publishes in July, and I’m in the early stages of writing something very different at the moment. Watch this space.

If you could recommend just one of your books to my audience, which one would it be and why? 

Definitely my first, The Dark Inside. Not just because it’s the start of the series and because everything that happens in the subsequent books stems from the events of that one, but because it was my first and I spent so long with it rattling around in my head, I think I’ll always have a particular attachment to that one!

How have you found the overall writing experience, from ideas and writing the novels, to getting an agent and being published? 

It’s been a blast. I love writing, and that hasn’t changed from pretty much the first day I started out. Certainly there are highs and lows, and I’ve experienced both, and it’s a career that requires a lot of self-discipline, patience and persistence. But when it’s just me, at a keyboard, with no distractions, it’s a great feeling.

Where can people find more information out you? (Website and social media?) 

You can find me on Twitter, @Rod_WR, and on Facebook. I love talking books, my own or other people’s, so don’t be afraid to @ me.

And I’m also usually at First Monday crime, the monthly event for anyone interested in crime fiction; check out the website https://www.firstmondaycrime.com/ and do come and say hello!

Books

The Dark Inside                                                                                                                                                                                                    Black Night Falling

Black Knight Falling

Black Knight Falling

The Dark Inside

The Dark Inside

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A massive thanks to Rod Reynolds for taking part in this Crime Writers interview series.  Do check out Rod’s books and also, if you do like reading crime, consider coming along to First Monday Crime.

Rebecca x

p.s. if you have liked this interview and have some other favourite crime writers why not drop me a message and I can see if I can interview them.  Or if you are a crime writer reading this, send me an email if you would like to be interviewed.  Email can be found on my contact page here!

I’m back… having the flu sucks!

I feel like I haven’t blogged in forever… but it has only been two/three weeks.  You may have seen the odd post go up, those are ones I wrote in advance and scheduled.

Not all of my posts I write in advance, some are written the day I see things or when I collate a list of news articles that are current and I want to share them with you.

I try and write a mix of content so that somethings I can schedule but others I can write and upload there and then.

Thank you so much for all of the lovely messages however, and all the people that checked in to ask where I was as they hadn’t seen me on social media much.

Having the flu sucks big time.  When people used to say “you will know when you’ve had the flu, it is nothing like having a cold” – they are right! I even had a flu jab last year and that didn’t save me from catching it.  It completely wipes you out and comes on so quickly, unlike a cold.

Is it bad that I totally missed being on twitter and instagram? I also really missed not being able to start conversations in my Facebook Group for law students.

I really like twitter as a platform for keeping up to date on legal news, topics, discussions and also what everyone (as well as law schools and law firms) are up to generally!

I am back, I am writing again, I am catching up on all of the things I have missed over the last few weeks and also seeing what is planned for the next few weeks in the legal world!

Have a great week!

Rebecca x

Mini-pupillage deadlines | January-March 2018

Now to every Chambers has a “window” for submitting your applications for mini-pupillage, but some do!

Here, however, are some of the ones with deadlines approaching.  The post is littered with links to help you, from information about their specific mini-pupillages, information on how to apply and also just what that Chambers is all about.

If you find this useful, do hit the share button or send the link to your friends/fellow law students.

4 New Square

4 New Square is a leading commercial set based in London.  Some of the areas of law they cover include: Commercial Chancery, Construction, Sports, Professional Liability, Commercial Fraud, Information Technology, Product Liability etc.  You can read more about their areas of expertise here and just click down the list on the left hand side panel.

They offer 4 periods of mini-pupillages throughout the year. Their mini-pupillages typically are for 2 days and usually take place in specific weeks in May, July, November and December of each year. They also try to take 10 mini-pupils per week.   Mini-pupillages do not include a formally assessed piece of work.

The application  deadline for the May (week commencing 14th May 2018) mini-pupillage week is 16th March 2018.

How can you apply? This webpage contains all the information you need to apply, with links to the necessary forms.

Quadrant Chambers

Quadrant Chambers is a commercial set based in London. You can check out all of their areas of expertise here, but they include ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution), Shipping, Insolvency and Restructuring, Chancery Commercial, Civil Fraud etc.

They have a number of mini-pupillages available throughout the year.  Their website states that potential mini-pupils should be at least in their second year of their degree and be expecting to graduate with a 2:1 or above.

Quadrant Chambers offer 2 day mini-pupillages which take place during the specific weeks (you can see the other dates if you click the link above).  Please note the applicable deadline for your application.

The deadline for applying for a mini-pupillage for weeks commencing 12th and 19th March 2018  is the 31st January 2018.

How can you apply? If you click this link it takes you directly to their application form.

Fountain Court

Fountain Court is predominantly a commercial set, and you can read all about their areas of expertise here.

Now the deadline for their mini-pupillage during 1st February and 30th April has passed, but the deadline for a mini-pupillage during the period 1st May to 14th July is  30th January.

How to apply?  If you click this link and scroll to relatively near the bottom, you will see a paragraph which contains the link to their application form.  Clicking on the link on their website will automatically download the application form.

Best of luck with applying! If you need a hand with your application forms or CVs, check out this blog post and video.  Also, don’t forget that there is a huge section in my ebook ‘A Brief Guide To Being A Law Student’ on all things CVs, Cover Letters, Application Forms and Interviews.  Plus a section on work experience, where I share ideas, top tips and how to make the most of the experience.

Rebecca x